Combination (Combo) Offenses

Successfully Attacking Combination Defenses

Combination defenses can be very devastating to any team not prepared to attack them. Combination defenses are primarily deployed to deny and limit the "touches" of an outstanding offensive player(s). They are also deployed as a surprise tactic. Like all defenses, combination defenses have their strengths and weakness. However, timing and surprise is the most critical factor to their success. The most commonly used combination defenses include: Box & One, Diamond & One, and Triangle & Two.

 

Click on desired Combination Offensive graphic below to view illustrated details.


 

Box & One Offenses

The most commonly used combination defense is the "Box and One." In this particular defense four defensive players play a box zone guarding areas while one player (the "Chaser") assumes an aggressive, full out pass denial position on the opponent's outstanding, offensive player.

Box & 1 Chase

Chase

Box & 1 Back

Flash

Box & 1 Horns

Horns

Box & 1 Pound Cake

Pound Cake

Diamond & One Offenses

A "Diamond & One" combination defense, similar to the Box & One, is primarily deployed to deny and limit the "touches" of outstanding scorer. The diamond zone alignment allows the defense to match up with a single guard front. Although the diamond and one is very effective in taking away the middle, it does give up the corners. Although, less commonly used than the Box & One combination defense, it can be very devastating to any team not prepared to attack it.

Clock

Clock

Box & 1 Back

Back Cut

Triangle

Triangle

Triangle & Two Offenses

The "Triangle & Two" defense can be an effective weapon when the opponents have two outstanding scorers or just as a change of defense to catch an opponent off guard. It can also be used at the end of the game when a team is trying to hold the ball.

Single/Double

Single/Double

Stack

Stack

Rotation

Rotation

 

 


 

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